Community meeting

Louisville community meeting emphasizes response before violence happens

Mayor Greg Fischer and several other community leaders hosted an candid discussion about violent crime in the Louisville subway. At King Solomon Church, Reverend Charles Elliott is known to take to the streets and educate anyone who wants to hear him about the need to stop the violence. And Thursday evening, he invited the community to his chair to find a solution. Concerned Louisville residents filled the church basement to have this candid discussion of the city’s rampant crime. Leaders from various sectors of the community, including Fischer, have tackled what lies at the heart of the problem head-on. “People are Scared”: Louisville FBI Chief Steps Up Efforts to Tackle Violent Crime “Let’s face it, guns are everywhere. We are the only country in the world that has this level of gun violence that we have. First, there are more guns on the streets of America right now than there are people in America. There’s a reason, “Fischer said. The second reason he’s tied to what he calls unacceptable levels of poverty in Louisville and the country. He said when you combine guns and poverty leads to violence. So how exactly do we solve the problem? ” Law enforcement is one of them. But if that was the solution, we wouldn’t see the numbers that we’re seeing right now, ”Fischer said. “We have to think about how we prevent, how do we intervene before violence happens. Continuous coverage: Metropolitan Council members learn how anti-violence program works to reduce crime The Metropolitan Government has quadrupled funding to the Healthy Neighborhoods Safety and Security Office to increase prevention and response initiatives violence. As the number of homicides in the city approaches record highs, JCPS Superintendent Dr Marty Pollio said student deaths were particularly affected. He said education and the power of choice are important for students and families to feel a sense of belonging. “When students have this sense of belonging, they are successful. This is what they do and too often where they find that this place is not a healthy and good place for them, ”Pollio said. The impact of education with this sense of inclusion brings us to the power of choice. One that Dr. Pollio thinks parents and students should have when considering schools they want to attend in West Louisville, where a new college or high school hasn’t been built since 1952.

Mayor Greg Fischer and several other community leaders hosted an candid discussion about violent crime in the Louisville subway.

At King Solomon Church, Reverend Charles Elliott is known to take to the streets and educate anyone who wants to hear him about the need to stop the violence. And Thursday evening, he invited the community to take the pulpit to find a solution.

Concerned Louisville residents filled the basement of the church to have this candid talk about the city’s rampant crime. Leaders from various sectors of the community, including Fischer, have tackled what lies at the heart of the problem head-on.

” People are scared ” : Louisville FBI chief steps up efforts to tackle violent crime

“Let’s face it, guns are everywhere. We’re the only country in the world that has this level of gun violence that we have. First, there are more guns on the streets of America right now. that there are no people in America. There is a reason, “said Fischer.

The second reason it is linked to what he calls unacceptable levels of poverty in Louisville and across the country. He said that when you combine guns and poverty, it leads to violence.

So how exactly do we solve it?

“Law enforcement is one of them. But if that was the solution, we wouldn’t be seeing the numbers that we are seeing right now,” Fischer said. “We have to think about how we prevent, how do we intervene before the violence happens.”

Ongoing coverage: Metro Council members learn how anti-violence program works to reduce crime

Metro Government has quadrupled funding for the Office of Safe and Healthy Neighborhoods to increase violence prevention and response initiatives.

As the number of homicides in the city approaches record highs, JCPS Superintendent Dr Marty Pollio said student deaths were particularly hard hit. He said education and the power of choice are important for students and families to feel a sense of belonging.

“When students have this sense of belonging, they are successful. When they don’t have a sense of belonging, guess what? not a healthy and good place for them, ”Pollio said.

The impact of education and this sense of inclusion brings us to the power to choose. One that Dr. Pollio thinks parents and students should have when considering schools they want to attend in West Louisville, where a new college or high school hasn’t been built since 1952.